Classification of Face and Teeth

Classification of Teeth

The classification of bites are broken up into three main categories: Class I, II, and III.

Orthognathic Surgery Presentation

To provide you with a better understanding of orthognathic surgery, we have provided the following multimedia presentation. Many common questions pertaining to orthognathic surgery are discussed.

Orthognathic Surgery Presentation

Having trouble? Please make sure you have the Adobe Flash Player plugin installed in order to correctly view this presentation. This software is available as a free download.

Class 1:
Class I is a normal relationship between the upper teeth, lower teeth and jaws or balanced bite.

Class I Normal
Normal
Class I Crowding
Crowding
Class I Spacing
Spacing

Class II:
Class II is where the lower first molar is posterior (or more towards the back of the mouth) than the upper first molar. In this abnormal relationship, the upper front teeth and jaw project further forward than the lower teeth and jaw. There is a convex appearance in profile with a receding chin and lower lip. Class II problems can be due to insufficient growth of the lower jaw, an over growth of the upper jaw or a combination of the two. In many cases, Class II problems are genetically inherited and can be aggravated by environmental factors such as finger sucking. Class II problems are treated via growth redirection to bring the upper teeth, lower teeth and jaws into harmony.

Class II Division I
Division 1
Class II Division II
Division 2

Class III:
Class III is where the lower first molar is anterior (or more towards the front of the mouth) than the upper first molar. In this abnormal relationship, the lower teeth and jaw project further forward than the upper teeth and jaws. There is a concave appearance in profile with a prominent chin. Class III problems are, usually, due to an overgrowth in the lower jaw, undergrowth of the upper jaw or a combination of the two. Like Class II problems, they can be genetically inherited.

Class III Skeleton
Skeleton
Class III Dental
Dental

Classification of Face

It is not sufficient to categorize orthodontic malocclusions on the basis of a classification of the teeth alone. The relationship with other craniofacial structures must also be taken into consideration.

Class 1:

Maxillary-Mandibular Dental Protrusion  teeth
Maxillary-Mandibular Dental Protrusion teeth:
This is an example of a dental malocclusion that may require the removal of teeth for correction.
Maxillary-Mandibular Dental Retrusion  teeth
Maxillary-Mandibular Dental Retrusion teeth:
This is an example of a dental malocclusion that may be treated with expansion rather than removing teeth.

Class 2:

Maxillary Dental Protrusion  teeth
Maxillary Dental Protrusion teeth:
This malocclusion may require the removal of teeth.
Mandibular Retrognathism  jaws
Mandibular Retrognathism jaws:
The lower jawbone has not grown as much as the upper jaw. This example of a Class II malocclusion demonstrates the need for early growth guidance.
Maxillary Dental Protrusion  teeth & Mandibular Retrognathism  jaws
Maxillary Dental Protrusion teeth & Mandibular Retrognathism jaws:
These Class malocclusions are more difficult to treat due to the skeletal disharmony and may require Orthognathic surgery in conjunction with orthodontic treatment.

Class 3:

Mandibular Dental Protrusion  teeth
Mandibular Dental Protrusion teeth:
The lower teeth are too far in front of the upper teeth. This malocclusion is treated with orthodontic procedures which may require the extraction of teeth due to the dental protrusion.

Mandibular Prognathism jaws:
The lower jaw bone has outgrown the upper jaw. This malocclusion is more difficult to treat due to the skeletal disharmony and may require Orthognathic surgery in conjunction with orthodontic treatment.